advice regarding purchased software – MoneySavingExpert.com Forums


not sure if anyone here can help, but its worth a shot.

i work in the design and architecture industry, and recently trialed a demo for a leading cad software package that a company i currently am freelancing for uses (its one of the big industry standard programs)

having used the demo (you have to download the full package, then select a workspace, so i selected the workspace i was intending to buy) having trialed the program, using the workspace for the one i was going to buy, i purchased it on my business credit card to the sum of around £1600 – however, now with my purchased licence key, i have realised that there are many items that are not available in the version that i bought but that were visible in the demo…

i have gone back to the supplier i purchased from, and they said they would contact the manufacturer on my behalf – they did this, and whilst they have offered an upgrade for a “substantial discount” (an additional £585) with no markup from them, they have not addressed the misrepresentation of the demo program itself, and that there are people out there using this, and purchasing based on the fact they believe that what they see and are using, will be in the program they purchase!

my main gripe is that they have offered the upgrade with 0 commision – whilst this is better than nothing, effectively its the supplier not making money from it and the manufacturer is still making money on the back of their misrepresentation of the demo they provide. had the demo been available for the verison i was intending to buy, it would not have been a problem because i would not have been using/seen features that i would not be getting

ultimately i feel a bit conned, the demo i used is not what i bought, i dont have much choice in using the program as i need it for work, but cannot afford the £585 for the additional features that were in the demo!

should i go direct to the manufacturer and give it a go? (feeling like the small ant being crushed under the big boot of big business)



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