Churchill Home Insurance reveals what do to if you live in a block of flats with noisy neighbours

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  • Everyone has the right to ask their neighbours to be more considerate
  • Churchill Insurance suggests using a statutory nuisance complaint
  • These can be raised with your local council if a polite conversation fails
  • Average fines issued for breaking a noise abatement order is more than £500

Myra Butterworth For MailOnline

I live in a luxury block of flats in a central city location, with neighbours who regularly hold late night parties.

Sometimes, it means I struggle to get more than a few hours sleep before I have to head off to work in the morning.

I’ve asked them politely to be more considerate to their neighbours, but this has been ignored. I then complained to my property managing agent, which sent out letters to the residents about noise levels. Would you advise any other action?

Everyone has the right to ask their neighbours to be more considerate, says Churchill Insurance

Everyone has the right to ask their neighbours to be more considerate, says Churchill Insurance

Everyone has the right to ask their neighbours to be more considerate, says Churchill Insurance

MailOnline’s property expert Myra Butterworth says: New neighbours may cause unwanted disturbances such as all night parties. While the odd incident may not be a concern, more regular episodes can take their toll. 

Often a polite conversation with your neighbour may be sufficient to nip it in the bud, and do let your property manager know what is happening – and when – so that there is a record. 

That doesn’t sound like it has worked. 

There other options you can consider if the noise persists, including raising a statutory nuisance complaint with the council.

Martin Scott, head of Churchill home insurance, replies: We can’t choose our neighbours and when someone new moves in next door many of us will find ourselves crossing our fingers, hoping they’ll be friendly and quiet. 

However, unfortunately this is not always the case. In fact, thousands of people are blighted by those who live around them each year.

If a polite conversation with your neighbours fails, further action may be necessary

If a polite conversation with your neighbours fails, further action may be necessary

If a polite conversation with your neighbours fails, further action may be necessary

It’s all about fairness. Everyone has the right to ask their neighbours to be more considerate, to keep their time at home as an enjoyable and peaceful as possible – free from unsociable noise, unruly rubbish or noxious smells.

When polite conversation doesn’t work, many people resort to raising a statutory nuisance complaint with their council. 

This can be used when someone is interfering with the enjoyment of a home or when an occupant’s health is at risk.

In the last year, local councils received 577,562 statutory nuisance complaints – that equates to 1,582 per day. The most common complaint was for noise pollution, followed by rubbish.

In the last year, local councils received 577,562 statutory nuisance complaints, which equates to 1,582 a day, says Churchill Insurance

In the last year, local councils received 577,562 statutory nuisance complaints, which equates to 1,582 a day, says Churchill Insurance

In the last year, local councils received 577,562 statutory nuisance complaints, which equates to 1,582 a day, says Churchill Insurance

To raise a statutory nuisance complaint people should contact their local council. Most of them have a dedicated number, including out of hours contact numbers, available on their website. 

An abatement order will be issued if the council agrees with the complaint that has been raised, which would then result in the person causing the disturbance being required to cease their behaviour or at least limit the activity to specific times of day.

Failure to comply with a noise abatement order could result in prosecution or a fine. The average fine issued for breaking a noise abatement order in 2016/2017 was more than £500.

Urban areas are likely to have a higher proportion of noise complaints as people live closer together, often in flats and terrace housing where people are more exposed to the noise of others. Council enforcement of environmental regulation is crucial to ensure the actions of inconsiderate individuals don’t impair the lives of others.

Anyone looking for further information on how to raise a noise abatement order should visit their local council website.

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