Ryanair pledges to reject all payout claims amid cancellation crisis


Ryanair is set to refuse compensation for some 100,000 passengers hit by its pilots’ summer holiday strikes, risking a showdown with Britain’s aviation watchdog.

The budget airline, which has been forced to delay hundreds of flights amid the biggest strike in its history, has pledged to reject all claims filed by disgruntled customers. 

But the Irish company risks the wrath of the Civil Aviation Authority who insist that compensation payouts of 250 euros – or £222 – are enshrined in EU law.

Ryanair is set to refuse compensation for some 100,000 passengers hit by its pilots' summer holiday strikes, risking a showdown with Britain's aviation watchdog

Ryanair is set to refuse compensation for some 100,000 passengers hit by its pilots' summer holiday strikes, risking a showdown with Britain's aviation watchdog

Ryanair is set to refuse compensation for some 100,000 passengers hit by its pilots’ summer holiday strikes, risking a showdown with Britain’s aviation watchdog

The budget airline, which has been forced to delay hundreds of flights amid the biggest strike in its history, has pledged to reject all claims filed by disgruntled customers

The budget airline, which has been forced to delay hundreds of flights amid the biggest strike in its history, has pledged to reject all claims filed by disgruntled customers

The budget airline, which has been forced to delay hundreds of flights amid the biggest strike in its history, has pledged to reject all claims filed by disgruntled customers

The pledge comes less than a year after the CAA threatened Ryanair with legal action over it handling of compensation claims when thousands of flights were cancelled following mismanaged holiday rotas for its pilots.

Despite the CAAs insistance that compensation is owed to passengers on some 600 cancelled flights, Ryanair counter that it is not due as unions were acting ‘unreasonably’.

Staff in Spain, Portugal and Belgium began their 48-hour strike yesterday, amid calls for increased pay, fairer working conditions, larger pensions and better job security.

Staff in Spain, Portugal and Belgium began their 48-hour strike yesterday, amid calls for increased pay, fairer working conditions, fatter pensions and better job security

Staff in Spain, Portugal and Belgium began their 48-hour strike yesterday, amid calls for increased pay, fairer working conditions, fatter pensions and better job security

Staff in Spain, Portugal and Belgium began their 48-hour strike yesterday, amid calls for increased pay, fairer working conditions, fatter pensions and better job security

A spokesman said: 'Ryanair fully complies with all EU261 legislation, however as these flight cancellations were caused by extraordinary circumstances, no compensation is due. Under EU261 legislation, no compensation is payable when the union is acting unreasonably and totally beyond the airline's control'

A spokesman said: 'Ryanair fully complies with all EU261 legislation, however as these flight cancellations were caused by extraordinary circumstances, no compensation is due. Under EU261 legislation, no compensation is payable when the union is acting unreasonably and totally beyond the airline's control'

A spokesman said: ‘Ryanair fully complies with all EU261 legislation, however as these flight cancellations were caused by extraordinary circumstances, no compensation is due. Under EU261 legislation, no compensation is payable when the union is acting unreasonably and totally beyond the airline’s control’

Ryanair said that passengers affected by the walkouts have been moved onto other flights or handed refunds.

But the move is likely have hit many Britons destined for the Mediterranean following the start of the six-week school summer holiday. 

One unhappy customer took to Twitter to blast the budget airline, writing: ‘No communication about flight cancellations and Ryanair provide four customer service staff to deal with hundreds of passengers because they simply don’t care.’

EU legislation on cancelled flights

Passengers are eligible to claim compensation payouts of €250 (£222) when short-haul flights are cancelled without being given at least two weeks’ notice. 

This is in addition to a replacement flight, or a refund.

Elsewhere staff in Dublin have announced plans for their own walkout on August 3, making it the fourth time their Irish employee base have downed tools in protest. 

Under EU legislation, passengers are entitled to 250 euros when short-haul flights are cancelled without a fortnight’s notice, in addition to refunds or new flights.   

Airlines can only avoid this payment under the EU261 system when the cancellation is caused by ‘extraordinary circumstances’ beyond the carrier’s control – including extreme weather incidents and strikes by air traffic controllers.

The CAA told The Times that the latest round of strikes by Ryanair cabin crew did not qualify as an ‘extraordinary circumstance’ because it was within the airline’s control.

It said:  ‘When a flight cancellation is caused by strike action by the airline’s employees, the airline is required to pay compensation to passengers in respect of the cancellation of the flight, if it has not warned passengers of the cancellation at least two weeks prior to the scheduled time of departure.’ 

A spokesman said: ‘Ryanair fully complies with all EU261 legislation, however as these flight cancellations were caused by extraordinary circumstances, no compensation is due. Under EU261 legislation, no compensation is payable when the union is acting unreasonably and totally beyond the airline’s control.’



Source link